Textile industry and water pollution – brought to you by some of your favorite retailers.

14 11 2012

In 2011 Greenpeace published two reports: one investigating the discharge of hazardous substances from textiles manufacturing in China linked to major clothing and sportswear companies (Dirty Laundry), and another detailing the presence of NPEs in clothing and footwear of 15 leading brands (Dirty Laundry 2: Hung Out to Dry). With the publication of these reports Greenpeace challenged global brands to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals from their supply chains and products by 2020.

The Detox Campaign, as it is now known,  is especially targeting Chinese manufacturers.  With nearly 50,000 textile factories, the “factory of the world” is in fact the first victim of textile water pollution, prompting even the government to face up to the problem. “China is moving toward legislation where each company is responsible for its wastewater,” said Ulrike Kallee. “Awareness is now very high.”

The man-made chemical by-products of the textile industry are shown to have long-term effects on the environment and potentially devastating impacts on human and animal life. Furthermore, when testing clothing from 15 corporate brands, Greenpeace found that the chemicals used in the textile production process continue to be released when contaminated clothing is purchased and washed by consumers across the world.  These tests demonstrate the truly global danger posed by these toxic chemicals as they are released into rivers and water sources from the point of production to the consumer.

I don’t know why there is not an outcry about the clothing which is continuing to contaminate washwater – doesn’t it occur to people that  clothing contains chemicals which are being absorbed by our skin and causing us harm?  For that matter, think about the fabrics we subject ourselves to intimately every day, like sheets and towels.  Where is the disconnect here?

Greenpeace’s Detox Campaign is helping create a greener economy by challenging major global brands to rid their textile production processes of hazardous chemicals. The Detox Campaign has already successfully demonstrated the power of grassroots activism and social media in pressuring corporations to clean up their production practices.  Only months into the Detox Campaign, major retailers H&M, Puma, Adidas and Nike committed to eliminating discharges of hazardous chemicals across their supply chains by 202; most recently Marks & Spencer joined the group. In addition to pressuring corporations to adopt greener production practices, Greenpeace is pursuing legislative changes within the textile industries in several Asian countries and the European Union in order to protect rivers and the communities and ecosystems they support.

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3 responses

14 11 2012
eremophila

Reblogged this on Eremophila's Musings and commented:
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21 11 2012
Michael Jacques

Greepeace’s position on textiles would be a little more credible IF their own merchandise was not also contaminated with the very chemicals they say are dangerous!
Story on http://www.ecotextile.com/2012111911788/fashion-retail-news/toxic-chemicals-found-in-greenpeace-t-shirts.html
Although they have withdrawn their T-shirts from sale, they state that consumers can still safely wear the ones already purchased.

http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/campaigns/toxics/water/detox/intro/Our-Textile-Policy/

But in the meantime, they present textiles in such an emotive way as on

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/greenpeace-warns-chemicals-global-fashion-article-1.1205131

It appears they have a dual approach… vilify brands for polluted garments but do not send us back polluted garment we sold to you!!
So much for Greenpeace!!

2 06 2013
Jeans Manufacturers

People who have established Textile Mills after spending millions but how sad it is that they dont take care of pollution issues and they dont spend penny on it

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