How to get rid of chemicals in fabrics. (Hint: trick question.)

10 11 2010

Can you wash or otherwise clean conventional fabrics to remove all the toxic residues so that you’d end up with  a fabric that’s as safe as  an organic fabric?  It seems a reasonable question, and sure would be an easy fix if the answer was yes, wouldn’t it?  But let’s explore this question, because it’s really interesting.

Let’s start by looking at one common type of fabric: a lightweight, 4 ounce cotton printed quilting fabric.  In this case the answer is no (and as you’ll find out, our answers will always be no, but read on to see why).

The toxic chemicals in conventionally produced (versus “organically” produced)  cotton fabric that cannot be washed out come from both:

1.      the pesticides and herbicides applied to the crops when growing the cotton and

2.      from the dyes and printing inks and other chemicals used to turn the fibers into fabric.

Let’s first look at the pesticides used during growing of the fiber.

Conventional cotton cultivation uses copious amounts of chemical inputs.  These pesticides are absorbed by the leaves and the roots of the plants. Most pesticides applied to plants have a half life of less than 4 days before degredation.(1)   So pesticides can be found in the plants, but over time the chemicals are degraded so the amount to be found in any bale of cotton fiber is highly depending on time of harvest and how recently the crop had been sprayed.  

Gas chromatography easily shows that  common pesticides used on cotton crops are found in the fibers, such as:  Hexachlorobenzene,  Aldrin, Dieldrin, DDT and DDT. (2)   Look up the toxicity profiles  of those chemicals if you want encouragement to keep even tiny amounts of them out of your house.   With time, as the cotton fibers degrade, these residual chemicals are released.

We could find no studies which looked at the fibers themselves to see if pesticides could be removed by washing, but we did find a study of laundering pesticide-soiled clothing to see if the pesticide could be removed.  Remember, this study (and others like it) was done only on protective clothing worn by workers who are applying the pesticides – so the pesticides are on the outside of the fibers  –   NOT on the fibers themselves during growth.  The study found that, after six washings in a home washing machine, the percent of pesticide remaining in a textile substrate (cotton)  ranged from 1% to 42%.  (3)

If you’re trying to avoid pesticides which are applied to cotton crops, you’d do better to avoid cottonseed oil than the fiber (if processed conventionally) because we eat more of the cotton crop than we wear.  Most of the damage done by the use of pesticides is to our environment – our groundwater and soils.

Before we go further,  let’s do away with the notion that organic cotton, woven conventionally, is safe to use.  Not so.  There are so many chemicals used during the processing phase of fabric production, including detergents, brighteners, bleaches, softeners, and many others that the final fabric is a chemical smorgasbord, and is by weight at least 10% synthetic chemicals (4), many of which have been proven to cause harm to humans.

The chemicals used in conventionally processed organic cotton fabrics make the concerns about  pesticides used in growing the crop pale in comparison:  If we use the new lower chemical inputs that GMO cotton has introduced, it’s now possible to produce 1 lb. of conventionally grown cotton, using just  2.85 oz of chemical pesticides – that’s down from over 4.5 oz used during the 1990’s – a 58% decrease.   So to produce enough cotton fiber to make 25 lbs of cloth,  it would require  just 4.45 lbs of chemical pesticides, fertilizers and insecticides.  Processing that fiber into cloth, however, requires between 2.5 – 25 lbs. of chemicals.  If we take the midpoint, that’s 12.5 lbs of processing chemicals – almost three times what it took to produce the fiber!

There are over 2,000 different kinds of chemicals regularly used in textile production, many of them so toxic that they’re outlawed in other products.  And this toxic bath is used on both organic fibers as well as non-organic fibers – the fibers are just the first step in the weaving and finishing of a fabric. (Make sure you buy organic fibers that are also organically processed  or you do not have an organic fabric.   An organic fabric is one that is  third party certified  to the Global Organic Textile Standard. )      Fabrics – even those made with  organic fibers like organic cotton IF they are conventionally produced and not produced according to GOTS –  contain chemicals such as formaldehyde, azo dyes, dioxin, and heavy metals.  Some of the chemicals  are there as residues from the production, others are added to give certain characteristics to the fabrics such as color, softness, crispness, wrinkle resistance, etc.    And these chemicals are designed to do a job, and do it well. They are designed to NOT wash out.  The dyes, for instance, are called “fiber reactive” dyes because they chemically bind with the fiber molecules in order to remain color fast.   The chemical components of your fabric dye is there as long as the color is there. Many dyes contain a whole host of toxic chemicals.  The heavy metals are common components of fabric dyes.  They are part of the dye and part of the fabric fiber as long as the color remains.

And these chemicals are found in the fabrics we live with.  Studies have shown that the chemicals are available to our bodies:  dioxins (such as the 75 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and 135 polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs)) were found in new clothing in concentrations ranging from low pg/g to high 300 ng/g in several studies. (5)

 

How do these chemicals get into our bodies from the textiles?  Your skin is the largest organ of your body, and it’s highly permeable.  So skin absorption is one route; another is through inhalation of the chemicals (if they are the type that evaporate – and if they do evaporate, each chemical has a different rate of evaporation, from minutes or hours to weeks or years) and a third route:  Think of microscopic particles of fabric that abrade each time we use a towel, sit on a sofa, put on our clothes.  These microscopic particles fly into the air and then we breathe them in or ingest them.  Or they  fall into the dust of our homes, where people and pets, especially crawling children and pets, continue to breathe or ingest them.

In the United States, often the standards for exposure to these toxins is limited to  workplace standards (based on limits in water or air) or they’re product specific: the FDA sets a maximum limit of cadmium in bottled water to be 0.005 mg/L for example.  So that leaves lots of avenues for continued contamination!

The bad news is that existing legislation on chemicals fails to prohibit the use of hazardous chemicals in consumer products -–and the textile industry, in particular, has no organized voice to advocate for change.  It’s a complex, highly fragmented industry, and it’s up to consumers to demand companies change their policies.  In the United States we’re waking up to the dangers of industrial chemicals, but rather than banning a certain chemical in ALL products, the United States is taking a piece meal approach:  for example,  certain azo dyes (like Red 2G) are prohibited in foods – but only in foods, not fabrics.  But just because the product is not meant to be eaten doesn’t mean we’re not absorbing that Red 2G.  Phthalates are outlawed in California and Washington state in children’s toys – but not in their clothing or bedding.  A Greenpeace study of a Walt Disney PVC Winne the Pooh raincoat found that it contained an astounding 320,000 mg/kg of total phthalates in the coat – or 32% of the weight of the raincoat! (6)

Concerns continue to mount about the safety of textiles and apparel products used by U.S. consumers.  As reports of potential health threats continue to come to light, “we are quite concerned about potentially toxic materials that U.S. consumers are exposed to everyday in textiles and apparel available in this country,” said David Brookstein, Sc.D., dean of the School of Engineering and Textile and director of Philadelphia University’s Institute for Textile and Apparel Product Safety (ITAPS).

The good news is that there are fabrics that have been produced without resorting to these hazardous chemicals.  Look for GOTS!  Demand safe fabrics!

(1)  “Degradation of Pesiticides on Plant Surfaces amd It’s prediction – a case study of tea leaves”, Zongmao, C and Haibin, W., Tea Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang, China.   http://www.springerlink.com/content/vg5w5467743r5p41/

(2) “Extraction of Residual Chlorinated Pesticides from Cotton Matrix, El-Nagar, Schantz et.al, Journal of Textile and Apparel, Technology and management,  Vol 4, Issue 2, Fall 2004

(3)  Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 1992  (23, 85-90)

(4) Laucasse and Baumann,  Textile Chemicals: Environmental Data and Facts, Springer, New York, 2004, page 609.

(5) “Dioxins and Dioxin-Like Persistent Organic Pollutants in Textiles” Krizanec, B and Le marechal, Al, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Smetanova 17, SI-2000, Maribor, Slovenia, 2006; hrcak.srce.hr/file/6721

(6)   http://www.greenpeace.org/raw/content/greece/137368/toxic-childrensware-by-disney.pdf





Characteristics of hemp

2 06 2010

We were charmed by this quote, which was written by Yitzac Goldstein of Earth Protex, many years ago:

Before Huang-Ti’s time                                      
clothing was made from skins of birds and animals.

But as time went on

people increased and animals were few

Causing great hardship.

So Huang-Ti ordained that

Clothing should be made from hemp fiber.

This is how the spiritual leader  changed matters

For the people’s benefit.

6th century A.D. historian Khung Ying-Ta on

The Yellow Emperor, Huang-Ti, 27th century B.C.

I love hemp, maybe just because of the lore associated with the plant – and I don’t mean the lore surrounding the hallucinogenic properties of the plants that are bred for high THC content!  So let’s get that part out of the way fast:

Hemp is another word for the plant Cannabis sativa. Yes, marijuana comes from this same plant genus – and so does hops, used to produce beer for millennia. But what we call “industrial hemp” is a different variety (or subspecies), called Cannabis sativa sativa.  Marijuana is from Cannabis sativa indica, which is bred to contain between 5 – 10% of the intoxicating substance delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC.  Industrial hemp, Cannabis sativa sativa, contains less than one tenth that amount.  Industrial grade hemp is not marijuana – it doesn’t look the same and if you tried to smoke it you’d probably die of carbon monoxide poisoning before you felt anything but sick. For more about the differences between the two varieties click here or go to the Industrial Hemp website.

Hemp is unique among other crops in that every part of the plant has utility and potential market value.  Here are some interesting facts about hemp that contribute to the lore I’m referring to:

  • In 1941 Henry Ford built a car with a plastic made from hemp and wheat straw.
  • Both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp on their plantations; in fact the colonial government mandated that people grow hemp.  Settlers used hemp fiber as money and to pay taxes.
  • The original Levi Strauss jeans were made from hemp.
  • The July 4, 1776 Declaration of Independence  was written on hemp paper.

The plant has been used for millennia for food, fibers and fuel.   Today it is said that over 30,000 different products can be made from hemp.  Hemp’s oilseed makes high-grade food and beauty products.  The stalks produce fiber and cellulose.  And today, because of its length and strength, hemp fiber is woven into natural advanced composites, which can then be fashioned into anything from fast food containers to skateboard decks to the body of a stealth fighter.  There are over two million cars on the road today with hemp composite components.

But hemp for luxurious fabrics?  I remember those macramé plant hangers that were all the rage in the 1970’s.  Hemp has a public relations campaign to wage, because when I thought of hemp a few years ago (before my enlightenment) all I could imagine was burlap bag and sisal rugs.  Turns out the technical revolution has even found hemp:  new developments from the 1980’s  in retting and processing the stalks has meant that the hemp fibers produced today are soft and lustrous enough for even the finest fabrics.

Many end users look for comfort and durability in choosing a fabric, so hemp’s softness and high abrasion resistance make it a competitive choice.  Hemp fiber’s positive qualities have been recognized over thousands of years of real life applications.  The texture of pure hemp textiles resembles that of flax linen, appealing to the eye with its subtle variations in thickness, but it is also versatile and can be blended with other fibers to create many different looks.  Hemp’s versatility as a textile is stunning:  hemp fibers can be woven alone or with other fibers to produce weaves from rugged canvas to the lightest, silkiest  gauze,  in an unlimited array of colors and finishes.  Hemp has a beautiful natural luster and a lush hand and drape not found with any other natural or synthetic fiber, even linen.

Hemp’s characteristics as a textile make it a desirable choice in many applications:

  • Hemp is stronger and more durable than any other natural fabric, including linen, which almost matches hemps abrasion resistance and tensile strength.  The result is that hemp has a longer lifespan than other natural fabrics.[1] (Patagonia is just one of the many companies which has published studies which demonstrate hemp’s superior strength; results for these studies range from 3 to 8 times stronger.)  Products made from hemp will outlast their competitors by many years.
  • Not only is hemp strong, but it also holds its shape, stretching less than any other natural fiber. This prevents hemp fabric used in upholstery, demountable panels, acoustic paneling or as wallcovering from stretching out or becoming distorted with use.
  • Hemp fabric withstands, even benefits from, commercial laundering. Its inherent luster and light reflective qualities are enhanced by washing; it becomes finer and more luxurious with use. Hemp also possesses excellent soil-release properties because it sheds a microscopic layer each time it is laundered. This eliminates soiling and exposes a fresh surface. In effect, this means that hemp retains its sleek sheen every time it is washed, that it never dulls, and that it releases stains more easily than other fabrics.
  • Hemp may be known for its durability, but its comfort and style are second to none.  The more hemp is used, the softer it gets: it wears in, not out, thriving on regular use and machine washing without suffering fabric degradation. Hemp actually becomes softer, more resilient and more lustrous as a result of washing.
  • Hemp’s superior absorbency, due to its porous nature, means that it is very breathable and quick drying. Hemp can absorb up to 20% its own weight while still feeling dry to the touch (vs. polyester, which can absorb a maximum of 6%). This is important in the case of any fabric that is in contact with human skin, such as sheets, as perspiration is rapidly absorbed. It feels cooler in summer yet during cool weather, air which is trapped in the fibers is warmed by the body, making it naturally warm.
  • Hemp’s absorbency allows it to accept dyes readily and retain color better than other natural fibers, including cotton.
  • Hemp has a high resistance to ultraviolet light; it will not fade or disintegrate from sunlight as quickly as other natural fibers. (Tilly Endurables introduced a new hat in 2004 after testing its hemp fabric to a UPF of 50+, the maximum ultraviolet protection rating given.[2]) UV damage is especially a problem for draperies and marine interiors, so hemp would be a good natural fiber choice for these applications.
  • Hemp fiber is highly resistant to rotting, and its resistance to mildew, mold and salt water led to its premier use in marine fittings:  the majority of all twine, rope, ship’s sails, rigging and nets up to the late 19th century were made from hemp.  The word canvas itself is derived from cannabis.
  • Finally, any product made of hemp is fully biodegradable and easily recyclable.

Hemp as a crop is also a standout.  The bio-regional model of agriculture focuses on obtaining high value for the resources of the local land, recycling the waste and end products ad infinitum and thereby creating a “closed circle” of farming and industry.  Hemp is an elegant solution to the crises created by modern agribusiness and conventional cotton production because:

  • Hemp grows well without the use of chemicals:  usually no pesticides or fungicides are used because it has few serious fungus or pest problems – although the degree of immunity to attacking organisms has been greatly exaggerated.  Several insects and fungi specialize exclusively in hemp!  But despite this, the use of pesticides and fungicides are usually unnecessary to get a good yield.    No herbicides are generally used because dense plantings shade out weeds; no defoliants are needed (as they are with machine harvested cotton) because the dried foliage is not a problem for harvesting.
  • Hemp requires less water to thrive than cotton – is actually drought tolerant –  and usually grows well without irrigation.  Globally, 77% of cotton crops are irrigated.
  • Hemp has a fiber yield higher than any other agricultural crop, thereby requiring less land for equal yield:

Average fiber production, in pounds, per acre:

Conventional cotton Organic cotton Flax Wool Hemp
121 – 445 lbs. 80  –  102 lbs. 323 – 465 lbs. 62  lbs. 485 – 809 lbs.

Source: UK-government funded project at University of London, “Demi: design for sustainability” (www.demi.org.uk), © Kate Fletcher, 1999

This yield translates into high biomass, which can be converted into fuel in the form of clean-burning alcohol, or no-sulphur man-made coal.

The most widespread claim for the environmental friendliness of hemp is that it has the potential to save trees that otherwise would be harvested for the production of pulp.  If  hemp reduces the need to harvest trees for building materials or other products, its use as a wood substitute will tend to contribute to preserving biodiversity.  Hemp may also enhance forestry management by responding to short-term fiber demand while trees reach their ideal maturation. In developing countries where fuel wood is becoming increasingly scarce and food security is a concern, the introduction of a dual-purpose crop such as hemp to meet food, shelter, and fuel needs may contribute significantly to preserving biodiversity.

For more on hemp, here are some resources to get you started:

Organizations

Web

Journals

  • Journal of the International Hemp Association. Vol. 1 (1994)–Vol. 6 (1999). (Vols. 1–5 and part of Vol. 6 available online at mojo.calyx.net/~olsen/HEMP/IHA/). Superseded by Journal of Industrial Hemp.
  • Journal of Cannabis Therapeutics. Hawarth Press. Vol. 1 published 2001.
  • Journal of Industrial Hemp. Haworth Press. Vol. 1 to be published 2002.

[1] Kerr, Nancy, PhD, “Fabulous Fibers? Can hemp compete with natural and manufactured fibers?” AgFibe2002 conference, Winnipeg, MB, Nov. 13 – 15, 2002.

[2] Press release, Tilly Endurables 2004; also see http://www.backpackgeartest.org/News/article.php?story=20050210193045692.





Just found this and had to share…

22 05 2009

I just found the web site for Green Air (www.greenairradio.com) which bills itself as  “a nationally syndicated news radio feature and multi-platform interactive hub for Green and environmentally significant news, stories and entertainment. It is comprised of a broad network of media professionals including producers, journalists, broadcasters, writers, photographers and filmmakers worldwide. Green Air creates, publishes, and distributes traditional and new media content with a contemporary and humanistic voice.”

While scrolling through the GreenAir search, I found the segment titled Toxic Textiles ( http://greenairradio.com/?p=1612 ) Please take the time to watch it!    It was an eye opener even for me, who prides herself on knowing the facts about textile manufacturing, but when I actually see those farmers spraying the pesticides – how it’s done in a developing country – and when I see the dyehouse workers wringing dyed fabrics by hand, it’s a different ballgame.  Not to mention the two women profiled who have health problems brought on by exposure to these fabrics.